GIVE

Dr. Phil Lounibos - Currently Active Research Collaborations

  1. Invasion Biology of Aedes albopictus. This project has been the major focus of our research since 1999, when we began to examine the ecology and genetics of establishments of this important arboviral vector species in the Americas. Co-investigators on this project have included Steve Juliano of Illinois State University, and George O'Meara of FMEL/UF, who shared (1999-2011) an R01 NIH grant awarded to me. Additional collaborators have included Jorge Rey FMEL/UF, Frederic Tripet of Keele University (England), and Claudia Codeço and Ricardo Lourenço-de-Oliveira at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in Rio de Janeiro. Research in Brazil between 2008-2011 was supported by a FIRCA grant from NIH's Fogarty International Center to investigate the ecology of invasive vectors in the context of endemic dengue transmission. A R21 award (2011-2014) from NIAID supported investigations on reproductive interference as a cause of rapid displacements of Aedes aegypti by invasive A. albopictus. This project has further incorporated collaborations in six countries where these two species are sympatric.
Ricardo-in-Florianopolis

Ricardo Lourenço-de-Oliveira (center) sampling Aedes albopictus from tires near Florianopolis, Brazil

  1. Malaria Vector Heterogeneity in Brazil. Led by FMEL Adjunct faculty Robert Zimmerman, we are investigating the ecology of malaria in the eastern Amazon Region where multiple species of Anopheles are involved in transmission to humans.
  2. Chikungunya Ecology in the Americas. This project was fomented by the establishment and spread late in 2013 of Chikungunya in the New World. We are currently collaborating with FMEL faculty Barry Alto and Cynthia Lord on projects, funded by Florida DACS, to assess risks of transmission of Chikungunya virus by Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in Florida. Elsewhere we are collaborating with Bernard Okech (UF, Public Health) on CHIKV in Haiti and Scott Weaver (UTMB, Pathology) and Amy Vittor (UF, Medicine) on this arbovirus in tropical South America.
collect-bromeliad

Steve Juliano (R) and colleagues search for mosquito immatures in the axils of a large bromeliad at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in Rio de Janeiro

IrkaTX

Irka Bargielowski aspirating for mosquitoes at a tire pile in Houston TX