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Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory

Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory

Dr. Panpim Thongsripong

Panpim Thongsripong

Panpim Thongsripong

Assistant Professor

Vector-borne Disease Ecology
thongsripong.p@ufl.edu

My research program centers on ecological processes of vector-borne disease (VBD) transmission. I combine mathematical models and bioinformatic tools with field studies and laboratory research to formulate frameworks that link environmental and social changes to host-vector contact as well as the microbial and viral communities of vectors driving disease transmission. It is critical that we understand how environmental and social changes affect the interaction between hosts, vectors, and microbes in order to better manage ecological drivers and human behaviors, and lessen the substantial public health threat posed by VBDs.

Please visit my lab website for current opportunities to join my lab.

Host-vector contact rate and disease ecology

The spread of VBD is fundamentally driven by the contact rate between the vertebrate host and vector. Despite the key role that host-vector contact rate has in driving disease transmission, most research assesses transmission risk primarily through the lens of vector density, and overlooks host-vector contact dynamics. Using mosquito-borne disease transmission as a model system, my research program aims to fill this gap in knowledge by incorporating innovative field survey tools and laboratory experiments to quantify the rate and pattern of host-mosquito contact. The carefully designed field and experimental studies are grounded in theoretical and ecological frameworks. Thus, the collected data can be readily incorporated in mathematical models to elucidate how variations in host community structure, its biology, and other environmental factors such as climate change, lead to heterogeneity in contact dynamics that drive VBD transmission.

Human influence on vector’s microbiome and virome

Vector-associated microorganisms and viruses can significantly impact VBD transmission. Combining Next Generation Sequencing and bioinformatic tools with laboratory research, I investigate how human activities can influence the composition and diversity of vector-associated microorganisms and viruses, highlighting the complex yet ubiquitous relationship between human, vector, and their symbionts. These experiments also lead to the identification of previously unknown or neglected mosquito-specific parasites with significant public health implications.

Environmental degradation and climate change intensify VBD transmission, which disproportionately impact poor and vulnerable communities. By addressing important social and environmental drivers of VBD and incorporating community-based research approach, my lab’s overarching goal is to establish and implement a relevant, sustainable, and inclusive VBD control program to enhance community health. I value interaction between scientists, public health workers, trainees, and local communities to welcome knowledges, traditions, and expertise from all people.

Panpim Thongsripong

Panpim Thongsripong

Assistant Professor

Vector-borne Disease Ecology
thongsripong.p@ufl.edu

  • Postdoctoral researcher, California Academy of Sciences, 2018-2021
  • Ph.D. in Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, 2017
  • M.S. in Biomedical Sciences (Tropical Medicine), University of Hawai’i at Manoa, 2012
  • B.Sc. in Biology, Mahidol University, 2007

Panpim Thongsripong

Panpim Thongsripong

Assistant Professor

Vector-borne Disease Ecology
thongsripong.p@ufl.edu

Publications

  • Thongsripong, P., Chandler, J. A., Kittayapong, P., Wilcox, B. A., Kapan, D. D., & Bennett, S. N. (2021). Metagenomic shotgun sequencing reveals host species as an important driver of virome composition in mosquitoes. Scientific Reports, 11(1), 8448.
  • Thongsripong, P., Hyman, J. M., Kapan, D. D., & Bennett, S. N. (2021). Human–Mosquito Contact: A Missing Link in Our Understanding of Mosquito-Borne Disease Transmission Dynamics. Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 114(4), 397–414.
  • Thongsripong, P., & Wesson, D. M. (2020). Effects of Ascogregarina culicis (Eugregarinorida: Lecudinidae) on mosquito size and dengue virus infection in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology, tjaa280.
  • Thongsripong, P., Qu, Z., Yukich, J. O., Hyman, J. M., & Wesson, D. M. (2020). An investigation of human-mosquito contact using surveys and its application in assessing dengue viral transmission risk. Journal of Medical Entomology, 1–13.
  • Edgerton, S. V., Thongsripong, P., Wang, C., Montaya, M., Balmaseda, A., Harris, E., & Bennett, S. N. (2020). Evolution and epidemiologic dynamics of dengue virus in Nicaragua during the emergence of chikungunya and Zika viruses. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 104680.
  • Thongsripong, P., Chandler , J.A., Green, A., Kittayapong, P., Kapan, D., Wilcox, B., Bennett, S. (2018). Mosquito vector-associated microbiota: metabarcoding bacteria and eukaryotic symbionts across habitat types in Thailand endemic for dengue and other arthropod-borne diseases. Evolution and Ecology, 8, 1352-1368.
  • Xue, L., Manore, C. A., Thongsripong, P., & Hyman, J. M. (2017). Two-sex mosquito model for the persistence of Wolbachia. Journal of Biological Dynamics, 11(sup1), 216–237.
  • Chandler, J. A., Thongsripong, P., Green, A., Kittayapong, P., Wilcox, B. A., Schroth, G. P., et al. (2014). Metagenomic shotgun sequencing of a Bunyavirus in wild-caught Aedes aegypti from Thailand informs the evolutionary and genomic history of the Phleboviruses. Virology, 464-465:312–319.
  • Thongsripong, P., Green, A., Kittayapong, P., Kapan, D., Wilcox, B., & Bennett, S. (2013). Mosquito vector diversity across habitats in central Thailand endemic for dengue and other arthropod-borne diseases. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 7(10), e2507.
  • Jean-Pierre Dujardin, P. Thongsripong and Amy B. Henry (2012). The Mosquito Fauna: From Metric Disparity to Species Diversity, Morphometrics, Christina Wahl (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0172-7, InTech.
  • Henry, A., Thongsripong, P., Fonseca-Gonzalez, I., Jaramillo-Ocampo, N., and Dujardin, J.P. (2010). Wing shape of dengue vectors from around the world. Infect Genet Evol 10:207-214.